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App Developers Prefer Apple...

This is a discussion on App Developers Prefer Apple... within the Android forum, part of the PC; If you're a gamer, here's why you should think twice before choosing Android - App Developers Signal Apple Allegiance Ahead ...

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    App Developers Prefer Apple...

    If you're a gamer, here's why you should think twice before choosing Android -

    App Developers Signal Apple Allegiance Ahead of WWDC and Google I/O

    TLDR -
    1. 7 out of 10 apps are built for iOS.
    2. 88% of tablet user sessions are logged on an iPad.
    3. Android fragmentation continues unabated with more than 20 different devices and 7 major OS versions.
    4. Supporting each device and version results in only marginal increases of market share for app developers - 17 of the top 20 devices have 6% or less market share.
    5. For every $1 a developer earns on iOS they can expect to earn only $0.24 on Android.
    Ouch...This isn't an isolated finding, there are more studies and articles to consolidate the argument that Apple is better than Android for gaming (and apps in general).

    Moral of the story...if mobile games are important to you and you prefer Android, stick with the largest market share - Samsung Galaxy S II running Gingerbread, or subsequent generations of the Galaxy. Not only will you get the best Android device, you'll get the best software support. Seems obvious really, but just think about it before picking up a Motorola or HTC device.

    Now if only someone would invent a decent Android tablet to compete with the iPad...
    Asus has made a fine device housing impressive specs, but it's nowhere to be seen in the wild and there's sweet FA games to take advantage of the hardware.

    Before you accuse me of trolling or hating on Android, I don't. We all have our justifications for choosing Android over Apple, or vise-versa. As a platform-agnostic gamer, the decision for me to go with Apple over Android was obvious - it's all about the games and I'll go where the most and the best are on offer.

    Do mobile games or apps matter to you when buying a new smartphone, or is it all about the hardware and OS features?

    For me, a phone is less of a gaming consideration than a tablet. I do 99% of my mobile gaming on an iPad and my smartphone needs are primarily office & productivity related rather than entertainment. Again Apple wins on that front...

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    I bought my phone to call people...I use my ds or vita for portable gaming.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dr_mayus View Post
    I bought my phone to call people...I use my ds or vita for portable gaming.
    Generally speaking my phone is just a phone 90% of the time, but you don't need a smartphone for that.

    Neither my DS nor my Vita get a look-in when the iPad's around and I'm not going to lug around another device when my smartphone consolidates all mobile needs (phone, video, photo, music, gaming, social media, web, email) into one.

    So why do people buy smartphones if not for the apps? Is it just to have an MP3 player and camera in addition to a phone? You don't need quad-core processing, AMOLED displays and a shiny OS for that...
    Last edited by ant1th3s1s; 06-09-2012 at 02:06 AM.

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    Meh, don't have a phone or a tablet, too much expensive and i would for example use an iPhone to call my friends or text them, i can do that on every phone
    If i want to game outside i just use my DS and in the future a Vita haha

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    I think this just comes from Apple products being more popular in general because "Oooooo iPhone/iPad"

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    Quote Originally Posted by ant1th3s1s View Post
    Generally speaking my phone is just a phone 90% of the time, but you don't need a smartphone for that. Neither my DS nor my Vita get a look-in when the iPad's around and I'm not going to lug around another device when my smartphone consolidates all mobile needs (phone, video, photo, music, gaming, social media, web, email) into one. So why do people buy smartphones if not for the apps? Is it just to have an MP3 player and camera in addition to a phone? You don't need quad-core processing, AMOLED displays and a shiny OS for that...
    what apps on my iphone are better than the games i can play on my vita or ds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbyblitzed View Post
    what apps on my iphone are better than the games i can play on my vita or ds.
    There's some cracking great iOS games including an increasing number of core games and PC/XBL/PSN ports, but the genre you play needs to be geared to the device's control scheme.

    Turn-based strategy, tower defense, match-3 puzzlers, physics puzzlers, board games, deck games, point-and-click adventures, RPGs, arcade racers etc are great on a touchscreen, but platformers, sports and shooters are not. That said, there are some decent shooters on iOS, more than you'll find on Vita.

    Here's a list of iOS games I play on a regular basis - (http://www.ps3trophies.com/forums/ap...tml#post225479). Add Autumn Dynasty to that list which is a gorgeous RTS game played from the perspective of a Chinese map painting.

    Different horses, different courses...one isn't necessarily better than the other, it's the convenience of an all-in-one device (and the relatively huge iPad screen) that means I play one more than the others.

    Where iOS / Android shine are value for money apps. I'd sooner pay $1-$4 for a decent yet oftentimes shallow and short game on iOS than $60 on a similarly shallow and short DS or Vita game. I'll sink the same amount of time, if not more, into a $1 game as I will on a $60 game. I refuse to pay $60 for a Vita game, so it remains unused until the decent titles like Uncharted Golden Abyss hit the bargain bin.

    For that reason more than any other (value for money) along with the all-in-one convenience, I've found myself gaming a lot more on iOS than dedicated mobile gaming consoles that don't do anything but play games.

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    As a user of both platforms, I really don't care for mobile games. I prefer gaming with a proper controller. The only games I have interest in are slow paced puzzle/thinking games like sudoku or mahjong. Anything remotely action oriented or fast paced I'm easily turned off by due to the inherent handling issues with a mobile device. Such as, holding the device too long with one hand (weight issue - ipad only); the other hand (or both in some cases) fighting on the screen and inadvertently obscures it (issue with all touchscreen devices); fear of dropping the device, etc.. I like the physical feedback that a proper controller gives, rather than no feedback from a smooth glass screen.

    Therefore, I use the iPad3 primarily for work, using dropbox (which is used in conjunction with my SGS2 and laptop) to display manuals, catalogues and price lists for customers. Secondary use is for the browsing the internet, youtube and music (in some cases).

    My choice for an android phone is obvious. I find the interface much more suited to my needs (I used the iphone 2G for 3-something years before switching), and it has a more customization features off the bat. The two capacitive touch-buttons are really nice to have rather than the zero that apple provides. Most SGS2 users are now on an official ICS build. I upgraded to samsung's official ICS firmware and found it near identical to the old gingerbread due to samsung's own UI and handling of features. I decided to be more adventurous and flash a custom ROM, and i can say that I much prefer it over the stock version.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aipher View Post
    My choice for an android phone is obvious. I find the interface much more suited to my needs (I used the iphone 2G for 3-something years before switching), and it has a more customization features off the bat. The two capacitive touch-buttons are really nice to have rather than the zero that apple provides. Most SGS2 users are now on an official ICS build. I upgraded to samsung's official ICS firmware and found it near identical to the old gingerbread due to samsung's own UI and handling of features. I decided to be more adventurous and flash a custom ROM, and i can say that I much prefer it over the stock version.
    I think you've nailed it on the head. The customisation Android offers far exceeds the walled-garden approach of Apple's OS, which is why power-users and anti-establishment types alike are attracted to the platform.

    But what about apps and games - do you find Android's offering limited compared to iOS, or is mobile gaming simply not a consideration?

    For my iPhone, cross-device compatibility between Mac and iOS productivity apps was a major consideration, gaming didn't rate a mention at the time of purchase. But for my iPad, gaming definitely played a large part of why I chose it over an Android tab, which was an extension of my mobile gaming experience on the iPhone. It wasn't important initially, but became more important as the App Store and iOS gaming matured.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ant1th3s1s View Post
    I think you've nailed it on the head. The customisation Android offers far exceeds the walled-garden approach of Apple's OS, which is why power-users and anti-establishment types alike are attracted to the platform.

    But what about apps and games - do you find Android's offering limited compared to iOS, or is mobile gaming simply not a consideration?

    For my iPhone, cross-device compatibility between Mac and iOS productivity apps was a major consideration, gaming didn't rate a mention at the time of purchase. But for my iPad, gaming definitely played a large part of why I chose it over an Android tab, which was an extension of my mobile gaming experience on the iPhone. It wasn't important initially, but became more important as the App Store and iOS gaming matured.
    I'm not so much anti-establishment, but I do like to look after myself and tailor things to my needs, rather than having no choice. This stems from my past as I was a heavy PC customizer back when I was younger and always built my PCs ground up and was meticulous on how and what was installed. Nowadays I just don't have the time or interest and settle fine with a portable laptop.

    As far as games are concerned, I've not noticed any shortage on android. All the basic quarters are covered with cut the rope, angry birds, and all of the cult classics. However it does miss some of the iOS exclusives like Infinity Blade. You can check what's missing on android at https://play.google.com/store but from what I've seen the selection of games is quite ample. Having said that, I'm not a big fan for mobile games so I'm probably not the most well informed person on the matter.

    I do agree that iOS makes cross-device compatibility transparent and largely hassle free for the average user, but for me, I don't have that need. Also I don't trust large companies and corporations with my personal information. I might sound like a hypocrite though because I actually do sync my contacts, bookmarks, etc with gmail. I think it has made strides in an apple-esque walled-in approach but with more superficial customization options available. Also, it's much more lenient on the use of 3rd party options, as in you aren't hindered if you prefer to use them, whereas with apple, you almost always HAVE to go apple. One thing that I am missing on the iPad though is flash support, but as html5 gets rolled out it shouldn't be such an issue.

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    That s y i picked iphone 4s when i needed a new phone

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    I stopped paying attention critically when you brought up Fragmentation because most arguments fall apart there, but an interesting read nonetheless.

    The fate of Android is still very much up in the air, although the OS will survive a significant amount of time regardless of what happens in the smartphone/tablet market and regardless of what Apple wants to do.

    I am waiting to see what happens when Windows 8 comes out. Between the improved boot-ups, the developer friendly environment (top to bottom), and the fact they are able to close the OS. Honestly I think this time next year we are going to be talking about Windows 8 vs. iOS and Android will become more like a Tizen/Meego
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    Gauss's Rating Rationale:
    0-1: A game whose very existence is abhorrent to all things creative and intelligent.
    2-4: A just plain bad game.
    5-6: A game that has alot of mistakes, but is atleast playable and has some enjoyable sections. Good for a rent.
    7: An average game, should be played at some point
    8: A good game, should buy at some point
    9: A great game, day-one purchase
    10: A game that goes above and beyond the generation, its transcendent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gauss View Post
    I stopped paying attention critically when you brought up Fragmentation because most arguments fall apart there, but an interesting read nonetheless.
    Fragmentation is an issue for app support, in particular the lack of smartphone to tablet compatibility. For iOS development, one build will run on two platforms. For Android, they need to be entirely separate apps.

    The key issue as it applies to gaming is, is it worthwhile supporting anything but the top few Android devices when 80% of your support resources are poured into 20% of your income?

    I can post that Battleheart interview again in which the dev states he's no longer supporting his app on Android, which is one of the top 50 earners to date, because of significant and ongoing support requirements. He likened Android users to loud, obnoxious babies and he ultimately did end up throwing the baby out with the bathwater by pulling support for new OS versions and limiting support for existing ones.

    You're pretty confident about Windows 8 and perhaps, rightly so. But the reception for Win 8 smartphones has been tepid at best. I guess at this point it's a matter of restoring confidence on Nokia and Microsoft's part by throwing significant dollars at a marketing and education campaign. That will be less of an issue once Win 8 hits the street, which will have a flow-on effect to the mobile version, so I understand your confidence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ant1th3s1s View Post
    Fragmentation is an issue for app support, in particular the lack of smartphone to tablet compatibility. For iOS development, one build will run on two platforms. For Android, they need to be entirely separate apps.
    That Apple statement in bold comes with so many caveats I can't take it seriously.

    Same goes for the Android statement, it comes with so many caveats I can't take it seriously.

    Both of which fall under the truth that you aren't comparing apples to apples with that sentence. Its ok, I don't blame you, its the wool Apple and pro-Apple people pull over the market's eyes. It all goes into how they bend statistics/statements to make their point, something I will delve deeper into later.

    Reality check. There is no way to truly build a version of an Apple application that supports every iDevice that runs iOS. There is a way to build a version of an Android application that supports the latest build(s) of Android across every relevant device (I'm not going to include custom builds).

    Whats more is, often, running the latest version of something isn't necessary. Particularly if your developer uses his or her tools properly. The API changes in the last few versions haven't been nearly what they are made out to be, and the post-ICS world of Android is a completely different story. When Android first came out it was the product of a few people working without the intention of making a long-term, commercial OS, and now Android has become significantly more stable in the last few releases and the roadmap is much more rigid (with tablets and SPs existing under the same umbrella).

    Quote Originally Posted by ant1th3s1s View Post
    The key issue as it applies to gaming is, is it worthwhile supporting anything but the top few Android devices when 80% of your support resources are poured into 20% of your income?

    I can post that Battleheart interview again in which the dev states he's no longer supporting his app on Android, which is one of the top 50 earners to date, because of significant and ongoing support requirements. He likened Android users to loud, obnoxious babies and he ultimately did end up throwing the baby out with the bathwater by pulling support for new OS versions and limiting support for existing ones.
    The problem I have with these developers is that many of them have their own agendas, much of this is all overexaggerated.

    Whats more is that I can't take their income estimates seriously, atleast not in most cases. All of these statistcs are bent to say what they want, Apple bends the table by using things like average app purchase price, which takes advantage of the fact that Android has 5x the free apps that Apple does, and will make a big deal about their insignificant approval process relative to Android's community-centric filter.

    Android will bend it the other way by presenting the opposite of all these arguments bent to say what they want, oh their apps are more free, their install base is larger, etc, etc.

    Its not that its not true, its that all of it is true all at the same time. Depending on your perspective, you take a different truth away.

    Even in this case, I doubt he is telling the truth about these 80% vs. 20% breakdown, and its highlighted by his statements about Android users. Heck, for all the stuff I hear about how easy Apple is... it doesn't seem to be reflected in App quality/stability.

    The reality is, when you filter the data down to its core argument, you are left with one contributing factor to this divergence: Apple owners spend more money than Android owners. Thats it, thats the only undeniable, perspectiveless truth, and thats the only way you can phrase it. Its not that they download more apps, its not that they are willing to tolerate higher app prices, its not that Android apps have more free corollaries, or that Android has lower quality apps. No... Its just that the average Apple owner will spend more money on applications in a year than their Android counterpart.

    Quote Originally Posted by ant1th3s1s View Post
    You're pretty confident about Windows 8 and perhaps, rightly so. But the reception for Win 8 smartphones has been tepid at best. I guess at this point it's a matter of restoring confidence on Nokia and Microsoft's part by throwing significant dollars at a marketing and education campaign. That will be less of an issue once Win 8 hits the street, which will have a flow-on effect to the mobile version, so I understand your confidence.
    Yes, I am. I can go on and on about Windows 8 and how its a major improvement over WP7.

    I think it will be successful because every major Tablet and Phone manufacturer except Asus will have a Windows 8 Tablet/Phone out this time next year and because Microsoft is (outside of Metro/HTML5-centricity) doing this right. They aren't rushing the OS, they are focusing on correct support, the versions have alot of code-reuse, etc.

    NOTE: All of these statements are provided by an owner of Microsoft, Linux, Android, and iOS devices who has developed applications for all 4.
    Gauss's Piracy Uncertainty Principle: When you pirate a game, that act inherently changes the results of what is to come after your pirating. You can't make any statement with any certainty regarding what would have happened had you not pirated the game.


    Gauss's Rating Rationale:
    0-1: A game whose very existence is abhorrent to all things creative and intelligent.
    2-4: A just plain bad game.
    5-6: A game that has alot of mistakes, but is atleast playable and has some enjoyable sections. Good for a rent.
    7: An average game, should be played at some point
    8: A good game, should buy at some point
    9: A great game, day-one purchase
    10: A game that goes above and beyond the generation, its transcendent.

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