Results 1 to 9 of 9

Limping to the finish line?

This is a discussion on Limping to the finish line? within the General PS3 Discussion forum, part of the Everything PlayStation; I stumbled across this while I was on twitter: As the we are about to enter the sixth or seventh ...

  1. #1
    Plats-O'-War!!
    kidson2004's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    All Around The World
    Posts
    4,528
    Reputation
    219

    Limping to the finish line?

    I stumbled across this while I was on twitter:



    As the we are about to enter the sixth or seventh year of this generation of machines, the biggest story is a lack of interest and sales.Microsoft and Sony weren't shy about letting everyone know that if they bought one of their consoles they would be playing them for a lot longer than usual. Sony was especially bullish, tagging its machine with a 10-year figure right out of the gate. At the time, it was exactly what we all wanted to hear. At $600, it was hard to rationalize spending that much on a video game console unless it was going to be viable for the long haul.

    Then again, no one saw it playing out the way it has. The knee-jerk reaction was that by 2012 these machines would easily have the largest installed base in the history of the medium. More time would mean more sales. We also thought that ideas would spring anew, and that by year six or seven there would be scores of games available each Tuesday. We thought game budgets would come down as developers became proficient with the hardware. We thought we'd be so in love with our Xbox 360s and PlayStation 3s that we'd scoff at the idea of their successors being released by year eight.

    None of this has come to pass. All three of the current consoles have a long way to go if they want to compete with the 150 million-plus PlayStation 2s that were shipped last generation. Not when the year over year figures look this grim. According to NPD's June report, overall spending is down 29 percent, hardware is down 45 percent, and software sales have seen a 27 percent drop. Only the Wii had a chance to even eclipse the 100 million mark and it was practically dead by year four. While there's no denying that the 360 and PS3 have worked against each other, even if you combine their sales the first HD generation has not been as successful as its SD precursor.

    New IPs are few and far between. Our list of nominees for Game of the Year 2011 had so many numbers it looked like a math equation. We had a hard time even finding five viable nominees for our Best Single-Player RPG and Best Racing Game categories in our Best of E3 2012 Awards. When you come out of E3 and there is only a handful a few games turning heads that aren't a sequel or a prequel, you're not exactly swimming in new ideas. At this point we're even seeing games that should be conceptualized as new IPS slathered in another game's license.

    The numbers aren't there, either. Take a look at our new release calendar tool and have a peek at the dearth of games from one week to the next. The output is unwhelming all things considered. I thought last summer was dry, but the prior three months have been torture.

    Development costs haven't exactly dropped, either. I can't recall a console generation where I've seen more studio closures, mergers, and outright scandals. The high cost of developing games has also forced developers to use middleware and one-size-fits-all engines. Or when they do build their own, they typically keep using the same tech release after release. Think about how far gamesadvanced graphically during the prior two generations. We haven't seen that kind of a leap this time around and there has been more time to spend on something like this.

    So here we sit with at least three years left on those 10-year projections and they look like a big pile of wishful thinking. It would be na´ve to think that the downturn in the worldwide economy hasn't had some form of an impact along with the rise of the $1 mobile game. And I have to admit that I'm surprised at how quickly digital distribution has taken a foothold. Games for PSN and Xbox Live have also become much more important than initially anticipated. It's great to see some of the features of these machines that I initially brushed aside become huge parts of the business–both financially, and creatively. Yet it's easy to see that none of the three have really lived up to their potential.

    So exactly who is this extended cycle good for? There's no hiding that risk aversion is now driving the industry. You see it in the lack of new franchises and a reluctance to invest in new technology. It's squashed interest in games and fewer of them are being released in total. It's got to the point where publishers appear to be sandbagging releases by pushing them unnecessarily into next year. When companies like EA are doing fine financially while its stock price tumbles, there's a perception problem. And the perception is that the industry is stagnating and struggling to develop exciting new ideas. For a medium that has built its reputation on driving unique entertainment experiences, it's inexcusable. Here's to hoping that when the NextBox and PlayStation 4 are announced that lessons are learned and expectations are kept in check. There's something to be said for finishing in style
    -Shane Satterfield
    Source: Reset: Consoles Limping to Finish Line | Side Mission | GameTrailers

    Thoughts?




  2. #2
    Stay golden, Ponyboy
    C_34_M's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    'Merica
    Posts
    488
    Reputation
    10

    I think the recession has had a big impact on sales. Obviously, people think more before making a purchase when money is tight and videogames are not even close to the top of the list of importance.
    Avatar by TheGeneral09 | Platcard by RavenScythe
    My Trophy Checklist


  3. #3
    Plats-O'-War!!
    kidson2004's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    All Around The World
    Posts
    4,528
    Reputation
    219

    Quote Originally Posted by C_34_M View Post
    I think the recession has had a big impact on sales. Obviously, people think more before making a purchase when money is tight and videogames are not even close to the top of the list of importance.
    Very true. Not only that: The quality of games nowadays as well. Some titles (which I shall not name ) should've been eradicated from the stores and those ideas as well (kinda off topic).




  4. #4
    Check Those Corners
    CallmeNasty's Avatar


    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    1,541
    Reputation
    45

    Quote Originally Posted by C_34_M View Post
    I think the recession has had a big impact on sales. Obviously, people think more before making a purchase when money is tight and videogames are not even close to the top of the list of importance.
    This. People are thinking about putting food on their plates and a roof over there heads at night. Video games come at about 4 out of 10. I am 13, have school, and a lot of other things on my mind. People have other priorities, ecpicially when the economy is the way that it is. That is why when the economy is better, sales will increase because most people will have more spending money.


  5. #5
    Plats-O'-War!!
    kidson2004's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    All Around The World
    Posts
    4,528
    Reputation
    219

    Quote Originally Posted by CallmeNasty View Post
    This. People are thinking about putting food on their plates and a roof over there heads at night. Video games come at about 4 out of 10. I am 13, have school, and a lot of other things on my mind. People have other priorities, ecpicially when the economy is the way that it is. That is why when the economy is better, sales will increase because most people will have more spending money.
    Bingo!! This is the sole reason why the sales are where they're at now. There's way more important things in our individual lives that takes precedence than gaming. Just wish some would understand that........




  6. #6
    Kiwi Defender
    Nagflar's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Vice City
    Posts
    6,570
    Reputation
    386

    The crappy world economy obviously has something to do with it, but even then the lack of innovation is thanks to the developers themselves, who instead of trying new ideas go for the safe option and release a sequel/prequel (which might also be related to the economy). Now the only new ideas seem to be brought up on the PC, the PSN and Xbox Live by a few indy developers that, with a few exceptions (like Thatgamecompany) rarely get the success they deserve.

    Toggle Spoiler



    Social Group of the Year (2011, 2012): Platboy Online.
    Sig by Ramon, so praise the crap out of him.
    My posts can be humorous or serious, but it's up to you to decide which posts are which.

  7. #7
    My Own Worst Enemy
    Self_Saboteur-'s Avatar


    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    UoK,KY
    Posts
    283
    Reputation
    26

    There is no doubt that the economy not exactly booming. But we are on the up slope if you ask me its not just the economy and every day worries its also this.---"New IPs are few and far between. Our list of nominees for Game of the Year 2011 had so many numbers it looked like a math equation".
    Things haven't changed much since then either. I would love to see more game developers be able to take chances and introduce new IP's. But its just not fiscally sound to take chances in this market. It just makes me sad to think this is what we have to look forward to. (Modern Warfare 400)


    (Props to dsluckay for the sig/avy) (Trophy bar by:Thunder)


  8. #8
    Legend...Nuff Said
    Lasombra's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Korea
    Posts
    1,535
    Reputation
    185

    Quote Originally Posted by Nagflar View Post
    The crappy world economy obviously has something to do with it, but even then the lack of innovation is thanks to the developers themselves, who instead of trying new ideas go for the safe option and release a sequel/prequel (which might also be related to the economy). Now the only new ideas seem to be brought up on the PC, the PSN and Xbox Live by a few indy developers that, with a few exceptions (like Thatgamecompany) rarely get the success they deserve.
    I don't get why people keep throwing around the word 'innovation'? I'm not aiming this at you, Nag, but at the gaming community in general. There are lots of innovative games out there. I don't get where this whole 'the industry is not innovative anymore' crap comes from.

    The article is a fluff piece, pure and simple. It must be a slow day at the office when irrelevant points like not surpassing the PS2 have to be used while not pointing out that the Wii/360/PS3 are the 3rd, 4th and 5th best selling console of all time. (Handhelds not included) That's an important freaking point to leave out for the readers. Also, he forgets to mention that the 360 tripled the sales of the original XBOX. I'd call that a success. Additionally, the SNES, which is the greatest system considered by many, sold a hell of a lot less than the original NES by 12 million units.

    As to why the drop in sales? World economy seems to be the flavour of the month but isn't true as told by the overall sales numbers below.

    The big 4 last gen line of PS2/XBOX/Gamecube/Dreamcast put up a combined total of 210.2 million units of sales.
    The big 3 current gen line of PS3/360/Wii put up a combined total of 228.05 million units of sales.

    1 less system and the current gen outsold the last gen.

    But lets add some handhelds to help push the point home further.

    With the GBA the last gen's sales are 291.71 million units.
    With the DS/PSP the current gen's sales are 453.47million units.

    This is why I hate current gaming journalism. They can't get their fucking facts straight and are becoming as bad as the modern media, leaving out important things like the truth, all for the hopes of creating fluff pieces like this that are completely untrue and a waste of space.

    L
    asombra Files Interviews and Top Trophy Tournament Commentary from Skip and Max linked in the banner.
    Checkout the Facebook page or follow me on Twitter @LasombraFiles
    My novels can be found here: The Lasombra Files: Choice and Consequence and
    Til Death Do Us Part
    Big thanks to the site for giving me my start as a writer!

  9. #9
    Korean Girl Group Groupie
    Rubicant81's Avatar


    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Inevitably, Unattainable
    Posts
    1,417
    Reputation
    151

    I'm going to keep this in a PlayStation 3 perspective, with the focus being on the PlayStation 3 console.

    Up until the launch of the PlayStation 3, Sony had known nothing but being the major front runner in the market in terms of console sales, third party support, and the most innovative first-party development (which really picked up steam when the PlayStation 2 came around, and they wised up and actually bought the IP's from their developers so that they belonged to them). Up until the PlayStation 3's release - Sony had known nothing but being the one who was in control of almost every aspect of the console market. Every major feature we have seen become standard, except for online gaming, was a Sony idea.

    Now one could argue that the PlayStation 3 was the first major failure for the gaming division of Sony, but that would be missing out on the failures and mistakes that Sony had done with it's initial foray into the portable gaming world, with the PSP. Sony had made the mistake of releasing something that didn't have a strong enough launch line-up, cost far more than it's competitors, didn't offer a hard drive or portable memory that was affordable enough or offered a balanced memory space per cost ratio, and offered an untested media format that was asking people to repurchase their media all over again on this new unknown format (UMD). Now take those issues that caused Sony so much problems, and switch out UMD with Blu-Ray and you realize, that the mistakes that Sony had made with the PSP from it's initial launch, ironically enough mirrored those of the PlayStation 3 when it launched in November of 2006 in Japan and North America.

    Now with the massive price tag, right out of the gate Sony was at a severe disadvantage - especially with Nintendo launching the Wii at about the exact same time which was showing all the world the promise of the future of a new type of controller, a cheaper price tag, and the promise of "innovation", mix this with the XBox 360 already having a year on the market, a cheaper price tag, and a much larger library of games already available. Sony never even got out of the starting blocks without falling down, cramping up, and having a nearly insurmountable disadvantage from the get-go.

    Now to the PlayStation 3's other major fault, which has been it's problem for a long time, is that it and the XBox 360 have been the two most similar gaming systems to ever be simultaneously on the market at any given time. We all know that the PlayStation 3 offers a top end Blu-Ray player, it's own wireless internet adapter built-in, but it also came with a price tag that was much higher than it's competitors for over two years after it's launch. Nearly every major third party game that is out there, and a large chunk of sales come from third party games, were available for both systems, and with the lack of exclusivity - there was a serious lack in the third party developer in releasing games that really pushed the envelope of "innovation" ;because the controller, ports, and look of both systems were so similar they really dropped the ball on pushing forth titles that stood out, unlike previous generations in which it felt like if a game ended up on one system or another and it was specially tailored to show-off that console.

    The PlayStation 3, of the big three, was the one system that probably did push it's innovation of titles a bit further than others with it's own first-party titles and is the least guilty of the first party developers in rehashing titles; but even then if you compare the exclusives list of this generation with any other in the past, first or third party, you will see that the lack of exclusives has somewhat stagnated the industry and cause original ideas and IPs to take a back burner to sequels, or multi-platform games or offered up a quick buck with "exclusivity deals" that lock content to a system.

    Nintendo had the most "innovative" system out there, but seems to have no idea on how to encourage developers (first and third party) on how to make games that matter or push the boundaries of gaming as we know it, except for an occasional blip once every couple years. Nintendo could have forced the issue with the games that it's system offered pushing the threshold of what a home console is capable of - instead the hardware was what drove most of the sales, with the controller being scene as the major reason, and as a reactionary measure both Sony and Microsoft instead of trying to figure out a new way to push the issue - hoped into the market of trying to sell "motion gaming" as the way of the future and since then have made ripples here and there, but really have never made a huge splash, as none of the ideas has seemed to find a way to develop a piece of software that makes these auxiliary devices "must own" features, and turned them into gimmicky devices that are risky ventures to support for since they don't sell or aren't worth the effort.

    Add in the entire "app" market, and the advent of social gaming, which over the last couple of years has really taken off, you have people who are able to turn their phones and computers into cheap gaming devices that offer dirt cheap, or free-to-play games, and you see a large part of the market shift as people question why they should drop $40-60 on a game, when they can play something for free or for a couple bucks that they put an equal amount of time in and get their fix for a much cheaper price. Don't let the recession or the global economy fool you into thinking that's why software sales are declining (I'd get into something called the Lipstick Effect here, but I doubt the overwhelming amount people are going to pick up on micro-economics fixture and how it works, but here's as short as I will get in defining it: when the economy is in the dumps, people actually spend more money on cheaper things, males in particular on items that keep them at home [video games being a huge piece of the pie] than they would on bigger things so that they still have some form of entertainment or something to make them escape the troubles of what they are going through - hence video games during recession [which we've been in for most of the world since 2001] normally boom, not decline as the last few years have shown us). Where is this market share disappearing to? Yep, social gaming.

    Add in the fact that Sony is bleeding money in almost every single other part of it's corporate infrastructure (movies and music being the exceptions), mix in the bad PR that the PlayStation brand can't seem to shake from the hacking in 2011, and the somewhat rushed launch of another ill-fated handheld to the market with bad timing, price tag, and lackluster library, it's not a big surprise as to why profit margins are dwindling (or disappearing), since things that are likely to get cut from the fold from these events are marketing, and first party support, and definitely expansion (another thing that helps add more innovation). The PlayStation 3 is kind of left in limbo at this point, instead of getting pushed with the titles that show off what the system is capable of at it's highest end, as it seems to be counting down it's days until it's inevitable successor comes along to takes it's place.

    The market seems to have changed dramatically, with people who want HD remakes of games, or sequels far more than willing to the chance on a fresh new idea that is untested and that the consumer is unsure as to whether or not they are going to like. It appears that a lot of individuals are trading in their games for pennies on the dollar to try and get the next game, and regretting it later and wishing that they can recapture that gaming experience again, whether it be in a sequel of sorts, a re-release, or the latest fad of "HD Collections". What this means is that instead of a lot of people working on taking chances (innovating the landscape) - a lot of the best game makers in the world are attempting to meet the market demand for revisiting old settings, or touching these old favorites up so that the people who didn't take better care of there titles before, sold them, lost them, or just want an imaginary accomplishment to a nostalgic experience can return down memory road. That doesn't exactly leave a lot of room for things that are new or unseen.

    So as we are coming down the final stages of the PlayStation 3's life cycle, is it limping down the home stretch? One could argue that it never got past the limp from it's launch and has never really been a big player in the race to begin with. I personally feel that it's going to be pretty close to impossible for it to catch up at this point, and that Sony would probably be better off in trying to fix the PlayStation Vita sales problem, and correct the mistakes of recent follies with the brand and make sure that the PlayStation 4 starts off strong from the get go than try and re-vamp the PS3 as this must own device that is going to last you 10 years. After this year, I doubt we will see more than maybe 2-3 first party "AAA" titles for the ole' PS3 after the ones we know exist as of now. The third party support will be there, because it's there for almost everybody and will be until the end - and it's likely we'll see a "Top 100" game of all time or two candidate before we move on to the next system. Sony has definitely been wounded this generation, and if not corrected the wounds could fester and prove fatal for the once seemingly invincible gaming juggernaut as it moves onto the next console generation.

    Need help? Just ask (blank friend requests will always be ignored)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.1.10
Copyright © 2018 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO